Lifestyle

THE KINGS OF QUEEN STREET

Of all the arts, theater is the most democratic. Advanced education is not a prerequisite, nor even literacy. And, as a rule, emotion carries more weight that intellect. Not to say that having a certain sophistication won’t enable a patron to appreciate literary allusions, historical references, in-jokes and subtle jabs of wit.

CURRENTS

What’s New, What’s Happening, What’s Now

GARDENING UNDER GLASS

While I’ve always found terrariums enchanting, I used to associate them with folksy macrame crafts. Both were frequently displayed together in artist co-ops during the 1970s. Somewhere along the line the crocheted rope craze faded, and terrariums became as obsolete as 8-track tapes. I’m glad these miniature glass gardens are making a solo comeback, but please don’t assume that Baby Boomers “invented” them.

THE FRENCH TOUCH

Women in France, it is said, invest in facials and other beauty treatments more often than women in the United States. They believe that taking care of their skin is a small but important luxury, so they regularly get facials, says Jean Baudrand, a Frenchman who is bringing the French skin care industry expert Guinot Institut Paris to the Charleston area. Now local women will have the opportunity to similarly indulge.

MIRACLE WORKER

Steel Magnolias rejoice! Master medi-clinical aesthetician Stephanie McChesney will be opening a new location in Charleston this spring and sharing her beauty secrets with Lowcountry clients. A leader in the clinical skin care industry, her beauty roots run deep.

WIND TRAVELER

The wandering albatross, a loner that flies in the winds above the world’s oceans, has always captured my imagination.

A MODERN EDUCATION

You might spot them on a warm winter day as you stroll down King Street—young women in purple-and-white plaid skirts and white polos. They are high school students conducting research, interning in the community or enjoying a break from their studies at Ashley Hall, the only all-girls college preparatory school in South Carolina.

THE LANGUAGE OF TEXTILES

As the name adopted for an international movement founded by Susan Hull Walker, ibu could not be more appropriate, for it also suggests the value that should be placed on the work of female artisans. From its showroom on King Street to online sales and trunk shows, ibu offers exquisite textile wares and other handmade items whose sales help support women in 38 countries.

EASY CHARM

Fashion can come from anywhere. Award-winning designer Billy Reid is proof of that.

CHARLESTON’S LITTLE WOMEN

Six stair-step sisters, born two years apart—Alice, Fay, Beatrice, Carlotta, Belle and Laura Witte—were the envy of Charleston. They lived in the antebellum mansion that is now the centerpiece of Ashley Hall School, and their bank president father firmly believed that they should have “whatever they cried for,” from jars of rock candy on long strings to twin doll houses large enough for small children to crawl inside.

WINES TO TRANSPORT YOU

Groucho Marx once said: “I shall drink no wine before its time. OK, it’s time!” If the old comedian were alive and kicking around the Holy City today, he’d find his way to Uncork Charleston.

MY CUP OF TEA

When autumn comes, the advice of writer Robert Brault rings true: “Enjoy the little things, for one day you may look back and realize they were the big things.” Maybe we just need a little more autumn in our lives.

REALTOR WITH A HEART

Camilla Rosenberg isn’t your average realtor. If anything, she’s more of a Jill of all trades.

WHIMSY, NOSTALGIA AND SYMBOLISM

Were he in Paris, David Boatwright would be thought a bon vivant, a boulevardier known for his ready smile, his menagerie of hats and a breezy manner.

BREAKING THE MOLD

Most nice Charleston girls were not dissecting corpses and drawing from nude models in 1892. They were busy preparing to lead lives filled with babies and needlework. Sabina Elliott Wells was different.

SIFTING THROUGH PROSE

When I first moved to Charleston more than 30 years ago, I didn’t know the difference between a camellia and a fig tree. To remedy my profound horticultural ignorance, I started reading my way through the gardening section of the Charleston County Public Library.

A PERSONAL TOUCH

When Lois Daughtridge was one of a handful of employees working at The Boutique—a home furnishings, accessories, gift and bridal registry store that has been in downtown Charleston for 60 years—she became known as “the bedding expert.”

INDIE GRANTS HELPS FILMMAKERS

It may not sound like much in an era of $200 million mainstream movie budgets, but the generous five-figure production funding awarded to independent filmmakers by the Indie Grants program can make all the difference in the world.

CURRENTS

What’s New, What’s Happening, What’s Now

FROM OLD COUNTRY TO LOWCOUNTRY

Johns Island, South Carolina, is known for narrow roads that wind beneath canopies of moss-draped oaks through miles of farmland and forest—not so much for a buzzing restaurant scene such as you’d find in downtown Charleston. Yet the island is a natural setting for farm-to-table dining, and Wild Olive has been filling that niche for nearly a decade. The restaurant’s cucina Italiana—Italian kitchen—spins updated Mediterranean classics that showcase the top-quality products of local farmers and fishers.