Design

EVOCATIVE PASTELS

“When I’m in my paintings, I’m home,” says artist Kellie Jacobs. Stacks of pastel paintings in brushed metallic frames lean casually against the sky blue walls in Kellie Jacobs’ dining room. They make the domestic scene, from the sideboard to the artist’s two little dogs, seem painterly. It’s as if you’ve stumbled into the surreal world of Claude Monet’s Water Lilies (one of Jacobs’ favorites), where reality and paint swirl together softly, naturally.

FROM FAN MAKERS TO FILMMAKERS

“My own piece of Charleston heaven.” That’s how actor Rachel McAdams described the charming kitchen house where she secreted herself away after grueling days filming The Notebook in 2004. Perhaps not as grandiose or famous as many of its South of Broad neighbors, the three-house property at 17 and 17½ Water St. exudes a creative energy that has, throughout its century-and-ahalf history, attracted artists and artisans, musicians and designers, and its fair share of actors and filmmakers. All have added to the property’s mystique.

In the Spotlight

Danco Modern Furniture Rock, recline and swivel in the ultramodern leather Cirrus Comfort Air chair. Featuring a channeled down back and seat topper, the patented weight-balancing mechanism responds to every move. Available in two sizes with multiple upholstery choices and three base finish options.

WELCOME HOME

Mary Ann Mackey and her husband, Jim, knew exactly what they wanted when they decided to build their dream home on Sullivan’s Island.

A SLICE OF HEAVEN

The story of the house on Salthouse Lane began as all good stories do, with a dream and a challenge that had to be overcome to achieve it. The homeowner’s dream was to build a simple but elegant house on Kiawah Island where he could host his four children, entertain friends, and enjoy the island’s renowned golf courses, isolated beaches and proximity to Charleston.

AN INVESTMENT IN HAPPINESS

Ask anyone who has turned a dream into reality and she will tell you that it takes diligence and determination to stay the course. In this city, no one knows that better than Ella Richardson. She is living proof that perseverance is the key to success. Richardson is the owner of Ella Walton Richardson Fine Art located in the heart of Charleston’s historical Arts District.

EVOLUTION OF AN ARTIST

From the time she was 4, Meredith Poston was drawing hands and skulls. You see, her father was a medical illustrator, and she became adept at copying his work.

NORTHERN EXPOSURE

Late artist Joan Miró once said: “You can look at a picture for a week and never think of it again. You can also look at a picture for a second and think of it all your life.” Art is different for everyone, and Reinert Fine Art brings works of all kinds to life—art of a caliber that lingers in the mind.

ALWAYS INSPIRED

In her Daniel Island studio overlooking the marsh, Betsy Jones McDonald paints quickly and dynamically. She blends colors directly on canvas using a “wet onto wet” technique and bold brushstrokes. Once the colors dry, there’s no going back; no adjustments will be made. This is how she evokes the energy Photograph by Holger Obenaus and vibrancy of a Lowcountry marsh.

NOBLE TRANSFORMATION

I am in the living room of a count and countess. There is an antique oil painting on the wall with tiny holes cut out at eye level. Everywhere I look there are inlaid marble and alabaster tables; carved busts of Italian nobility; rich, dark oil paintings; intricate chandeliers; hulking ceramic urns; and ornate furniture. Here is a 16th-century Italian palace in the middle of Charleston.

STYLISH STORAGE

Marble-topped islands with deco drawers. Glass-fronted cabinets with brushed nickel handles. Crown molding, trim and light fixtures that add style and a sense of comfort and elegance.

CELEBRATING THE VIEWS

“Hello, marsh!” exclaims architect Marc Camens as he opens the front door to the home he designed in Kiawah Island’s Ocean Park neighborhood. His greeting is apt. In this house your eye sweeps from the entrance through an expanse of glass windows, past the home’s outdoor living areas to the majestic golden greens of the Lowcountry marshlands.

ART IN MOTION

A slogan is posted in Tom Potocki's studio: “The Magic Is in the Mess.” To me, there are a few ways to interpret that slogan, but for Potocki the “magic” likely refers to the mysterious spark of creativity that inspires his work.

ABSTRACT REALIST

Beaufort, South Carolina-based watercolorist Casa Huger Bacot took the long road to becoming an artist.

CALL A SUPERHERO

In the Lowcountry, basements are uncommon. Absent a need to dig the foundation beneath a frost line, which is standard procedure in other parts of the country, there isn’t much economic sense in building down into the ground. Plus, there are other considerations—the Lowcountry’s high water table and mold and mildew brought on by periodic flooding and high humidity.

HALL OF MIRRORS

Great art, some have argued, is like a mirror: If we look, we will see our own nature, our own humanity reflected. Great works of art attract our attention and show us all of the emotions and ideas we bring with us. If this is true, if great art does reflect something inside us and show something about ourselves, then LePrince Fine Art on King Street is a hall of mirrors.

ON THE CUTTING EDGE

When John DeZinna drove down to Charleston from Pennsylvania in the aftermath of Hurricane Hugo with a fellow framer and a truck filled with tools, he got a job within an hour of arriving. Hugo’s destruction created a frenzied demand for skilled labor. That’s when DeZinna noticed that flooring companies were few and far between.

CORE CREATIVITY

Imagine using art as a teaching tool: inspiring young people not just to create, but to achieve things previously unimaginable in their worlds. That’s what Carlyn Ray has been doing for the past five years with her organization Art Reaching Out (ARO).

IMPRESSIVE ARTIFACTS

The natural décor business owned by mother and son Empress and Micah Gilbert displays a breathtaking collection of earthly treasures, and their gallery is, literally, the most impressive in Dallas.

A VIBRANT SPACE

Opening an art gallery is no small feat. It takes time, effort, talent and attention to detail. And it always helps to have a bit of good fortune on your side, too. Thankfully, when it came time for the Mount Pleasant Artists’ Guild (MPAG) to open a gallery space, fortune favored the endeavor.