Food & Wine

LITTLE JEWEL BOX

Whether you’re hunting down a hot spot for dinner or a space to say, “I do,” consider a visit to the Old Village Post House Inn.
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RENEWAL

The quilted landscape of western Sicily stretched out before me—a patch of vines here, a square of silvery-green olive trees there, a rectangle of young grain in the distance.
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REVOLUTION

Things are changing in Sicily. If you are familiar with Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa’s wondrous novel, The Leopard, or the movie it inspired, you may recall what Tancredi Falconeri said to his uncle, Don Fabrizio Corbera.
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THE ARTFUL PALATE

Muse Restaurant & Wine Bar is a celebration of Mediterranean foods and wine—and so much more.
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HOLIDAY GIFTS FOR ENOPHILES

As the season of giving draws nigh, you may want to exchange gifts with wine-loving friends. Here are three options that our wine columnist likes.
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OREGON PINOT NOIR

They said it couldn’t be done: grow Pinot Noir in Oregon. They were wrong.
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PEAK SEASON

With a recent facelift, an unwavering commitment to locally sourced ingredients, and a streamlined wine and cocktail menu, FIG is better than ever. It’s very hard to improve upon perfection, but chef/partner Mike Lata, executive chef Jason Stanhope (both hold the prestigious James Beard Award for Best Chef in the Southeast) and the entire team at FIG have done just that.
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COOL CLIMATE WINES

It was six or seven years ago that I first tasted wines from Sonoma County’s MacRostie Winery (macrostiewinery.com). I liked them, and I resolved to visit the winery the next time I was in California.
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HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT

The red wines of Spain’s Rioja region lope along from strength to strength, gaining steadily in repute as the years pass. The blancos—whites—are not yet as well known as their carmine cousins. In fact, as one writer observes, Rioja is so famous for its reds that “many people remain completely unaware that the region also produces white wines.” What a shame.
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A DRAMATIC COMEBACK

The century-old warehouse glows in the cool spring night, its fresh stucco, dark French doors, gas lanterns and weathered stone steps inviting you in. It is a happy sight to see this property in Charleston’s historic City Market alive again with soft lights, music and hungry folks.
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A CULINARY LEGACY

Like many major cities on the culinary map, Charleston enjoys an increasingly well-rounded assortment of cuisines and trendy restaurant motifs to match. But how many food-forward towns can boast an eatery quite like 82 Queen, where history and cuisine meet in the intimacy of a Southern antebellum home? Here, a pair of 18thcentury properties, linked by ancient brick paths, lend genteel profiles to a restaurant that has served loyal guests for over 30 years.
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TENUTA DI CAPEZZANA

It must have been a splendid wedding—the union of Caterina Maria Romola di Lorenzo de’ Medici, the pride of the Medici clan, with Henri de Valois, Duke of Orléans, second in line to the French throne. The bride’s uncle, bearded Pope Clement VII, traveled to Marseilles to conduct the marriage ceremony in the Église Saint-Ferréol les Augustins on 28 October 1533.
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ALWAYS A CLASSIC

For those of you who remember the early days of the Charleston “food scene,” you’ll recall that fine dining options were few and far between. I am thinking of the mid-1980s, moments before Hurricane Hugo slammed into this coastal city and changed its landscape forever.
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THREE FACES OF FURMINT

Nobody quite knows where the Furmint grape originated. A white varietal, it is cultivated today under various names in eastern parts of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire— especially in Hungary near the town of Tokaj, about 120 miles northeast of Budapest (almost to Slovakia and Ukraine).
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RISING STAR

It was a good day for all the food-obsessed folks residing East of the Cooper when Dianne and Cecil Crowley changed their minds about retiring. Over the next two decades, the couple amassed a string of successful eateries in the Southeast and opened the latest in their cadre of businesses: the spanking new Tavern & Table on popular Shem Creek.
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WHEN THE LIVIN’ IS EASY

One thing we know for sure: Vinho Verde wines are not green—citrine, pink or red they may be, but never green.
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THE RIGHT MIX

When a restaurant has dominated a corner overlooking two of Charleston’s busiest streets for nearly two decades, it’s doing something right.
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RENAISSANCE

It may well have been the Phoenicians who first grew wine in Sicily. The ancient mariners founded colonies in the western part of the island as early as 1000 B.C.—including what became the cities of Marsala and Palermo.
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Poetry in a Bottle

He liked to write using green ink, an odd choice for a dedicated Communist like Neruda. Why not use colors traditionally associated with his comrades on the Left—black or blood red? No, he was a poet and a romantic. His ideas flowed best in sustainable green, which was for him the color of hope and desire.
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East Meets West

Our Lowcountry winters provide just enough chill to make me crave a rich cassoulet while consumed in a cozy banquette with a friend or two. Who doesn’t love the homey comfort of chicken and dumplings—braised slowly into heartwarming heaven and served bistro style? Union Provisions fills the bill, combining laid-back West Coast chic and time-honored techniques to bring guests an American spin on the traditional French brasserie.
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